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RAVENS

The common raven (Corvus corax) can weigh as much as 3.5 lbs, and live up to 40 years in captivity?! They are omnivores and will mimic sounds from their environment... including human speech. Interestingly ravens mate for life and have the largest brains of any avian species.  Ravens are bigger than their cousin the crow and they also have larger heaver curved beaks;shaggier throats; and a more wedge shaped tail.

Reference from Hobby Farms Magazine Sept/Oct 2010


What not to feed your dog... even if it begs...

In 2006 ASPCA (American society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) received over 116,000 calls regarding poisioning alone.  Some of the items that could harm your pooch listed include: Macadamia Nuts, Garlic, Grapes, Onions, Yeast, Chocolate, Alcohol, Coffee and Xylitol... click the link below to see their interactive info

Reference: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2007/10/pets/dog-poisons-interactive.html


GREENER BACON... HOW?

Like all animals, pigs require phosphorous to build cell membranes and transport energy... pigs traditionally can not digest phytate ( a phosphorous-heavy molecule in grain) Todays solution? Fortify pig feed with pure phosphate or phytase, an enzyme to help the pig digest the usable phosphate in their feed. Swine still excrete nearly all the phosphorous they eat, which in turn can wash into waterways and oceans elevating phosphorous levels contributing to algal blooms that steal oxygen from fish and create huge marine wildlife complications.

Introducing the "Enviropig"... A Yorkshire swine bred with genetically modified salivary glands, now in its eighth generation these pigs excrete 30-65 percent LESS phosphorous than pigs currently going to market. The genetically modified pigs salivary glands excrete phytase which breaks down the phytate into digestable phosphate in the mouth... phosphate suppliments are no longer required.

Reference from the Popular Science October 2010 Issue


 

 

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